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Buses replace subway, St. George to Bloor,
June 7, 8



The TTC continues its project to install a new signal system along the 1 Yonge - University - Spadina line this weekend.

It’s closing the entire line south of Bloor Street — between St. George and Bloor Stations — all day Saturday, June 7 and Sunday, June 8. To replace the trains, it’s operating 120 shuttle buses, dropping off and picking up passengers every three minutes at stops along Yonge Street, University Avenue and Queen’s Park, Since construction blocks Front Street West, buses operate along King or Wellington Streets West between Yonge and University.

The TTC is laying the foundation for the new automatic train control signal system along the line to improve its reliability and capacity. Modernizing the subway requires crews to upgrade signals, relays, wiring and cabling equipment.

The City of Toronto will help speed up the shuttle buses by changing the timing of traffic signals along Yonge Street and University Avenue and prohibiting right turns at the intersection of Bloor and Yonge Streets.

Trains operate along the 1 Yonge - University - Spadina line only between Downsview and St. George Stations and between Finch and Bloor Stations this weekend. Frequent accessible buses operate between St. George and Rosedale Stations. Trains operate with regular service along the 2 Bloor - Danforth line, stopping in St. George and Yonge Stations.

YUS-St George to Uni.jpg

TTC shuttle buses start their trips in St. George Station bus terminal, then proceed:

southward along Bedford Road;
eastward along Bloor Street West;
southward along Queen’s Park, Queen’s Park Crescent West and University Avenue;
eastward along King Street West;
northward along Yonge Street;
eastward along Crescent Road; and then
southward into Rosedale Station,
ending their trips.

Buses drop off and pick up passengers in the bus terminals at St. George and Rosedale Stations, then serve stops on the street beside the entrances to closed stations:

  • on Queen’s Park north of Charles Street West for Museum Station;
  • on Queen’s Park at College Street for Queen’s Park Station;
  • on University Avenue at Dundas Street West for St. Patrick Station and at Queen Street West for Osgoode Station;
  • on King Street West east of University Avenue for St. Andrew Station and at Yonge Street for King Station; and
  • on Yonge Street at Queen Street West for Queen Station, at Dundas Street West for Dundas Station, at Carlton Street for College Station, at Wellesley Street East for Wellesley Station and at Bloor Street West for Bloor Station.

Buses do not enter the terminal at Wellesley Station.

On their return trip, buses start their trips in Rosedale Station, then proceed:

westward along Crescent Road;
southward along Yonge Street;
westward along Wellington Street West;
northward along University Avenue, Queen’s Park Crescent East and Queen’s Park;
westward along Bloor Street West;
northward along Bedford Road;
westward along Prince Arthur Avenue; and then
southward into St. George Station terminal,
ending their trips.

Buses likely drop off and pick up passengers in the bus terminals at Rosedale and St. George Stations, then serve stops on the street beside the entrances to closed stations:

  • on Yonge Street at Bloor Street West for Bloor Station, at Wellesley Street West for Wellesley Station, at College Street for College Station, at Dundas Street West for Dundas Station, at Queen Street West for Queen Station and at King Street West for King Station;
  • on University Avenue at King Street West for St. Andrew Station, at Queen Street West for Osgoode Station, at Dundas Street West for St. Patrick Station and at College Street for Queen’s Park Station; and
  • on Queen’s Park north of Charles Street West for Museum Station.

Buses do not enter the terminal at Wellesley Station.

Regular subway service resumes Monday, June 9.

Shuttle buses do not serve Union Station. Transfer to buses operating along the 6 Bay route to reach the area near Union.


The TTC says that only certain subway stations will be open for paying or buying fares or for connecting with buses and streetcars, while the subway is closed.

Osgoode, St. Andrew, Queen and Dundas stations will be open for fare transactions. Wellesley Station will be open for fares and for connecting to buses operating along the 94 Wellesley route. Museum, Queen’s Park, St. Patrick, Union, King and College stations will be closed.

Since trains are not operating along the southern end of the subway line, the TTC is taking the opportunity to close Union Station for ongoing construction of the station concourse and second platform projects. Passengers ustomers can access the PATH underground walkway system from Royal Bank Plaza at Front and Bay Streets. TTC staff will be on hand to help passengers at all subway stations that the closure affects.


Alternative ways to travel to and from points in downtown Toronto south of Bloor Street:

  • 2 Bloor - Danforth subway to Main Street Station. Transfer to streetcars operating along the 506 Carlton route to reach points near College and Queen’s Park stations.
  • 2 Bloor - Danforth subway to Broadview or Dundas West Stations. Transfer to streetcars operating along the 504 King route to reach points near Queen and Osgoode Stations. Transfer to streetcars operating along the 505 Dundas route to reach points near Dundas and St. Patrick stations.
  • 2 Bloor - Danforth subway to Castle Frank or Ossington Stations. Transfer to buses operating along the 94 Wellesley route to reach points near Wellesley, Museum and Queen’s Park stations.
  • 2 Bloor - Danforth subway to Castle Frank, Sherbourne, Bay, Spadina or Bathurst stations to transfer to buses operating along the 6 Bay, 65 Parliament, 75 Sherbourne routes or streetcars operating along the 510 Spadina or 511 Bathurst routes; then further transfer to east-west streetcars or buses to reach your destination. (If you pay your fare with tickets, tokens or cash, be sure to pick up a paper transfer if you plan to board buses at Bay or Sherbourne stations.)
  • Streetcars operating along the 501 Queen route also link east- and west-end points to the area near Queen and Osgoode stations.

Or:

  • Exit the Yonge branch of the line further north, then transfer to westbound buses or streetcars to the University - Spadina branch of the line.
  • From Sheppard - Yonge Station: board buses operating along the 84 Sheppard West route; board subway at Downsview Station.
  • From York Mills Station: board buses operating along the 96 Wilson or 165 Weston Rd North routes; board subway at Wilson Station.
  • From Lawrence Station: board buses operating along the 52 Lawrence West route; board subway at Lawrence West Station.
  • From Eglinton Station: board buses operating along the 32 Eglinton West route; board subway at Eglinton West Station.
  • Buses operating along the 5 Avenue Rd route link passengers from Eglinton Station to the area near St. George, Museum and Queen’s Park stations.

Why is the TTC closing the subway?

The TTC is resignaling the entire 1 Yonge - University - Spadina subway line to improve its reliability and capacity. It expects to finish this work by 2018.

During the closures, crews typically install new cables, signalling equipment beside the tracks and special track work in the tunnels. The TTC says this work is labour-intensive and can’t all occur during the normal maintenance period each night when subway service ends, (although the work does continue in those areas each night). Every time the TTC closes a section of the subway for an entire day, it saves about five weeks of night work.

After this weekend, the TTC will have to close parts of the subway in other areas to replace the entire signal system.

Subway infrastructure — for example, signal systems, tunnel structures or track beds — requires constant maintenance and, after more than half a century of service in some cases, the TTC may need to fully replace these critical parts of the subway.

Some of the benefits of upgrading the signals include:

  • More safety
  • The new signal system will control train speed and the distance separating trains will now automatically instead of humans controlling speed and distance.
  • The system also allows “real time” central train control with precise data to locate trains.
  • Better travel times
  • Automatically driven trains reduce travel time since they always travel as close to the speed limit as possible.
  • The travel time will consistent every trip.
  • Lower operating costs
  • Trains use less electricity.

The TTC has produced another “explainer” video about the signal-system upgrade project:

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